NASA

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory used CloudTest On-Demand to pre-stress the NASA web site to be sure it could handle up to 100 million web site visitors prior to the landing of the Curiosity Rover when it landed on Mars.

Eight months after NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) sent the Curiosity Rover to Mars, millions of people simultaneously logged onto NASA.com to watch it land on the Red Planet.

SOASTA, working with JPL and partner Amazon Web Services (AWS), helped ensure a reliable web experience so viewers worldwide could watch the Curiosity landing.

The availability and performance of the web site was critical during the landing. Prior to working with SOASTA and AWS, NASA’s JPL did not have the web and live video streaming capabilities to support the anticipated web traffic.

“NASA’s biggest issue before the Mars landing was that they couldn’t predict how many people were going to watch the landing,” so they had to be ready for anything, said SOASTA CEO Tom Lounibos. “We helped them understand what the costs could be to support 100 million users watching around the world and where those servers would come from to get the sites performing well under such a load.”

Cloud computing enabled JPL to provision capacity rapidly and deliver a never-before-seen public experience of Mars. SOASTA’s performance engineering team ran extensive performance tests to prepare for those hundreds of Gbs of streaming video to be beamed back to earth to be watched by millions of people worldwide, including in Times Square.

Now that Curiosity has parachuted safely to Mars, the NASA web site will continue to stream images of the scientific experiments conducted in the martian environment.